The Weekly Standard – Review of City of Scoundrels by Gary Krist

Gary Krist’s City of Scoundrels reminds us how rich and enthralling reality can be in the hands of a great storyteller. He employs an easy, enthusiastic hand to produce a briskly paced, thoroughly American tale that provides moments of great comedy and tragedy, along with a steady diet of spectacular calamity.

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Washingtonian – Review of The 500 by Matthew Quirk

Matthew Quirk’s gripping first novel, The 500, opens in DC’s “most respected strategic consulting and government affairs firm,” where young-gun attorney Mike Ford is cutting a deal for his life with the most ruthless man in Washington. Meanwhile, a Serbian war criminal with a penchant for eating the hearts of those who cross him waits outside in a Range Rover stuffed with Brioni-clad goons. “Die in infamy, honor intact,” Mike thinks, “or live in glory, corrupted.” Not the best options anyone’s ever had in this town but probably not the worst, either.

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Washingtonian – Review of As Texas Goes… by Gail Collins

New York Times columnist Gail Collins got interested in Texas after a 2009 Tea Party rally at which Rick Perry toyed with the idea of secession. But when a friend sent her a story out of Dallas—man allegedly beat woman with frozen armadillo—she decided to devote a book to the “scrappy” state. As Texas Goes . . . reads like a Collins column: well researched, often funny. “If we lived in a world where parents and teachers always got their first choice when it came to teenagers’ sexual behavior,” she writes of Texas’s embrace of abstinence-only sex ed, “Texas would be so in the vanguard.”

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NPR – Review of Me the People by Kevin Bleyer

At the beginning of Me the People: One Man’s Selfless Quest to Rewrite the Constitution of the United States of America, Kevin Bleyer calls our founding document “a God-sanctioned, fully realized, blessed, immutable, rock-solid, entirely glorified and purely calcified … piece of [censored].” And despite what our current batch of lawmakers might have you believe, he’s not alone in that opinion.

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