San Francisco Chronicle – Review of Double Cross by Ben Macintyre

In July 1942, Thomas Argyll “Tar” Robertson, the improbably jocular head of the MI5 section that oversaw Britain’s double agents during World War II, known as section B1A, suddenly found himself sitting on a weapon that could propel the Allied forces toward certain victory: the entire German spy ring in Britain. “The only network of agents possessed by the Germans in this country,” Robertson wrote in an official memo to his superiors, “is that which is now under the control of Security Service.”

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Washingtonian – 2012 Summer Reads

Washingtonian had me reach out to a bunch of people I admire in DC’s literary world – including The Washington Post‘s Ron Charles, Slate‘s Dan Kois, and NPR’s Maureen Corrigan and Alan Cheuse – for some summer beach read recommendations. They didn’t disappoint.

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NPR – Review of The Violinist’s Thumb by Sam Kean

The discovery in early July of a subatomic particle that may be the Higgs boson — also known as the God particle — puts physicists one step closer to unlocking the secrets of the universe around us. Sam Kean’s dynamic, brainy new book, The Violinist’s Thumb: And Other Lost Tales of Love, War, and Genius, as Written by Our Genetic Code, tells a story that’s no less profound: how geneticists strive to unlock the secrets of the universe within us.

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Washingtonian – Review of When We Were the Kennedys by Monica Wood

Glance at the smiling, sun-kissed girls on the cover of Monica Wood’s gorgeously wrought new book, When We Were the Kennedys: A Memoir From Mexico, Maine, and you might assume it recounts a magical, privileged summer spent chasing boys and learning to sail in New England. But this is a book about sharing something else with America’s royal family: the tragic, shocking loss of a father in 1963.

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Washingtonian – Review of The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln by Steven L. Carter

Seven score and seven years ago, on Good Friday evening in the nation’s capital, four men embarked on a conspiracy to assassinate the President, Vice President, and Secretary of State. One of those men succeeded, of course, but anything might have happened that fateful night, a fact that Stephen L. Carter brilliantly exploits in his big, intricately plotted new novel, The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln.

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